With a Covid-19 vaccine in hand, who should get it first?

With a Covid-19 vaccine in hand, who should get it first?

With a Covid-19 vaccine in hand, who should get it first?

With a Covid-19 vaccine in hand, who should get it first? – STAT

he ethical challenges that have arisen so far in the coronavirus pandemic largely boil down to the age-old struggle between individual freedoms and the public good. Issues like restricting movement and commerce to protect community health or requiring health care workers to treat infected patients, even at the risk of getting infected themselves, are specific examples of this larger dilemma.

AstraZeneca could supply a vaccine  from September

AstraZeneca could supply a vaccine from September

AstraZeneca could supply potential coronavirus vaccine from September

AstraZeneca has said it has the capacity to manufacture 1bn doses of the University of Oxford’s potential Covid-19 vaccine and will begin supply in September if clinical trials are successful. The Anglo-Swedish drugmaker said it had signed the first agreements to supply at least 400m doses of the potential vaccine, yet to be proven effective, which it is developing with the university.

Vaccine experts say Moderna’s Covid-19 data leave big questions

Vaccine experts say Moderna’s Covid-19 data leave big questions

Vaccine experts say Moderna’s Covid-19 data leave big questions

eavy hearts soared Monday with news that Moderna’s Covid-19 vaccine candidate – the frontrunner in the American market – seemed to be generating an immune response in Phase 1 trial subjects. The company’s stock valuation also surged, hitting $29 billion, an astonishing feat for a company that currently sells zero products.

A TB vaccine  could work?

A TB vaccine could work?

Can a century-old TB vaccine steel the immune system against the new coronavirus?

Researchers in four countries will soon start a clinical trial of an unorthodox approach to the new coronavirus. They will test whether a century-old vaccine against tuberculosis (TB), a bacterial disease, can rev up the human immune system in a broad way, allowing it to better fight the virus that causes COVID-19 and perhaps prevent infection with it altogether.