We can’t skip steps on the road to a COVID-19 vaccine

We can’t skip steps on the road to a COVID-19 vaccine

We can’t skip steps on the road to a COVID-19 vaccine

We can’t skip steps on the road to a COVID-19 vaccine

The pharmaceutical company Moderna started the last, longest step in the process of testing its COVID-19 vaccine candidate at the end of July – a Phase 3 clinical trial. It’s an enormous undertaking: their goal is to recruit 30,000 people, inject some of them with an experimental vaccine and then follow each and every one of them to see how many contract the coronavirus and how many do not.

I Was Wrong: We Can’t Skip Phase 3 Vaccine Trials

I Was Wrong: We Can’t Skip Phase 3 Vaccine Trials

I Was Wrong: We Can’t Skip Phase 3 Vaccine Trials

I wrote a blog post over the weekend that has generated tremendous pushback, including an op-ed in the New York Times as well as thousands of comments on Twitter. In my previous post, I suggested that while we’re pursuing Phase 3 testing of several promising Covid-19 vaccines, we could simultaneously offer those same, unapproved vaccines to a wider community of volunteers, as long as those volunteers were fully informed.

I’d Need Evidence Before I’d Get a Covid-19 Vaccine. It Doesn’t Exist Yet.

I’d Need Evidence Before I’d Get a Covid-19 Vaccine. It Doesn’t Exist Yet.

Opinion | I’d Need Evidence Before I’d Get a Covid-19 Vaccine. It Doesn’t Exist Yet.

Scientists need to show us the data. And that’s exactly what they’re working on. By Dr. Dean is an assistant professor of biostatistics at the University of Florida. Coronavirus vaccines are rapidly advancing through the development pipeline. The University of Oxford’s vaccine is in large trials in Britain, Brazil and South Africa.

Don’t hold your breath for a coronavirus vaccine. Here are the 7 biggest challenges we still need to overcome.

Don’t hold your breath for a coronavirus vaccine. Here are the 7 biggest challenges we still need to overcome.

Don’t hold your breath for a coronavirus vaccine. Here are the 7 biggest challenges we still need to overcome.

Drugmakers, scientists, and governments are racing to develop a coronavirus vaccine at unprecedented speeds. It seems possible, or even likely, that a vaccine could be available by early 2021. But there are countless obstacles to creating a successful vaccine and ensuring people take it, including public skepticism about a vaccine’s safety and the fair and equitable distribution of shots.

Coronavirus vaccine is closer than the market thinks, Wharton’s Jeremy Siegel predicts

Coronavirus vaccine is closer than the market thinks, Wharton’s Jeremy Siegel predicts

Coronavirus vaccine is closer than the market thinks, Wharton’s Jeremy Siegel predicts

Wharton finance professor Jeremy Siegel expects a game changer. He predicts a coronavirus vaccine is closer than the market thinks. “We’ve had almost no setbacks in the schedule developing the vaccine, and I think that’s where upside surprises can occur,” Siegel told CNBC’s ” Trading Nation” on Tuesday.

‘Vaccine nationalism’ could lead to the coronavirus devastating public health and the economy, experts warn

‘Vaccine nationalism’ could lead to the coronavirus devastating public health and the economy, experts warn

‘Vaccine nationalism’ could lead to the coronavirus devastating public health and the economy, experts warn

“Vaccine nationalism” is turning the search for a Covid-19 cure into an arms race, which will ultimately damage the economy and public health, experts have warned. Analysts at Eurasia Group speculated that tension over a vaccine would heat up over the summer, predicting a battle for access that will stretch into 2021 or 2022.